kids

A 1970s Kid's Longing for Clackers, Pong, Battleship...
A 1970s Kid's Longing for Clackers, Pong, Battleship...
As a product of the 1970s, there's still a longing to reminisce about toys from a decade that offered a limited selection of electronics. Not to mention nothing that resembles the technology we have today. With the exception of retro toys such as Simon, Speak & Spell, Pong, Atari 2600, Baby Alive, Easy Bake Oven, and Mattel's Electronic Football, most that held a child's undivided attention that did not require an electrical outlet or batteries 50 years ago were Rubik's Cube, Pet Rocks, Weebles, Clackers, Big Wheel, Connect Four, Uno, Barbie, G.I. Joe, Nerf Football, possibly Hungry Hungry Hippo and more. As for Cabbage Patch Dolls, they were manufactured in mass consumption in 1982 by Xavier Roberts. So, unless you were able to purchase an original prototype created by Martha Nelson Thomas in 1976, we'll save discussion of that trendy doll for an article about toys from the 1980s. So, what toys did you embrace growing up in the 1970s?
A Recap of SNOFLINGA Slated for this Weekend
A Recap of SNOFLINGA Slated for this Weekend
Time to get ready for Snoflinga in Butte starting January 20th! Earlier this month, Tommy O. and Jasmine of Townsquare Media provided information on our websites about the many events planned for three solid days of winter fun! Now that it's crunch time let's revisit the itinerary! To get things off to a great start, Snoflinga's Open Ceremony will get underway this Friday from 5 pm to 9 pm at the Butte High Altitude Skating Center (34 Olympic Way). From there, it's a winter wonderland of top-notch events this Saturday and Sunday (January 21st and 22nd). (See Below)
A Sign Pets have More Clout than Your Kids
A Sign Pets have More Clout than Your Kids
Most parents have the instinct to be nurturers from the get-go. Some parents coddle and dote over their offspring like there's no tomorrow, while others have a "tough love" approach to parenting. Either way, parents at some point (cross your fingers) earn kudos from family and friends for raising "good kids". In a sense, spoiled but structured children with insight into the world around them. Now, I wouldn't know anything about the "spoiled" part growing up (do you believe that for a minute?), but I do know that a distinct dynamic exists in homes with multiple kids. Come on, we all know it's true; parents treat each child differently in one way or another, even if it's minute. I admit I was less lenient with my eldest than I was with my other kiddos. Plus, the fact that they didn't know what the word "grounded" meant until someone told them at school was a sure sign that they got their way quite often as kids.
Upcoming "Christmas Store" Gives Kids Freedom to Pick Out Gifts
Upcoming "Christmas Store" Gives Kids Freedom to Pick Out Gifts
This Saturday (December 3rd), and for the first time since 2019, the Women's Club in Anaconda will have just that; a Christmas Store designed specifically for children "only" to shop for their loved ones. It's an exciting experience for the kiddos. Volunteers will be on-site to help these young shoppers pick out up to 8 items priced at ONLY $1 each. Community members over the past month brought in donations and gifts, so the selection is expected to be great! Volunteers will also be there to wrap all chosen gifts. Here's where to bring your youngster for a shopping experience like no other this Saturday: Ancient Order of Hibernians Hall at 106 Cherry in Anaconda. The Christmas Store will be open from 9 a.m. until noon. Proceeds will go towards AJHS Women's Club Scholarships. Let the shopping begin!
A "Butte-iful" Holiday Craft Show is Coming Soon
A "Butte-iful" Holiday Craft Show is Coming Soon
We're not even two days past Halloween, and wouldn't you know it; it's time to move on to another excellent event underway, but this time for the holiday season. The calendar doesn't lie as Thanksgiving will be here before you know it, which means another wonderful rendition of the "Butte"iful Christmas Craft Show is coming! This spectacular, feel-good craft show for the whole family will take place at the Front Street Station in Butte on Saturday, November 26th, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, November 27th, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Door-to-Door Halloween Treats...THEN & NOW
Door-to-Door Halloween Treats...THEN & NOW
Halloween is fast approaching, and trick-or-treaters have been excited about it for weeks! Near and far, kids will scope out businesses and special events on Halloween for delicious treats, while many will keep to the tradition of going door-to-door. Trick or treating, or "mummin" as remembered by many locals growing up, dates back to 16th century Scotland and Ireland. Over the years, it was considered "guising" because children would go house to house disguised in costume seeking food or money. In North America, the art of "guising" became popular in 1911 and eventually earned the name trick or treating. From a pagan ritual to a light-hearted festive party described in Roger's Tricking Halloween, the concept of acquiring goodies on this special night and then devouring the sweet treats for days has remained the same over the years. However, the main difference is that many of the HALLOWEEN TREATS that are popular now didn't exist years ago, and vice versa. If you grew up in the early 70s, common treats to make their way to your Halloween bag were popcorn balls, Cracker Jacks, Ring Pops that you could wear as jewelry, Bottle Caps (the root beer ones were the best), Pop Rocks that crackled and popped in your mouth, Necco Wafers, Zotz, and those d*mn candy wax lips and teeth that I admittingly chewed like a stick of gum moments after displaying them on my face. Occasionally, we would come across "that one neighbor" who thought it would be cool to pitch a can of soda on top of our beloved candy or throw in a caramel apple wrapped in wax paper. I even received a can of green beans in my Halloween bag one year. Looking back, it was certainly more of a trick than a treat for a youngster. Who knows what that was about? The bean giver must have been in a mood or did it for shock value. At that age, you didn't question the treat; you just made sure to continue to the next house and hope for the best.